Outsourcing and supply chains

Páginas:1-157
RESUMEN

The Comparative Labor Law Dossier (CLLD) in this issue 3/2016 of IUSLabor is dedicated to outsourcing and supply chains. We have had the collaboration of internationally renowned academics and professionals from Belgium, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Portugal, Spain, United Kingdom, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Mexico, Peru, Dominican Republic, Uruguay and Canada. El... (ver resumen completo)

 
EXTRACTO GRATUITO
IUSLabor 3/2016
COMPARATIVE LABOR LAW DOSSIER
OUTSOURCING AND SUPPLY CHAINS
Abstract
The Comparative Labor Law Dossier (CLLD) in this issue 3/2016 of IUSLabor is
dedicated to outsourcing and supply chains. We have had the collaboration of
internationally renowned academics and professionals from Belgium, France,
Germany, Greece, Italy, Portugal, Spain, United Kingdom, Argentina, Brazil, Chile,
Colombia, Costa Rica, Mexico, Peru, Dominican Republic, Uruguay and Canada.
El Comparative Labor Law Dossier (CLLD) de este número 3/2016 de IUSLabor está
dedicado a la externalización y cadenas de producción. Hemos obtenido la
participación de académicos y profesionales de prestigio de Alemania, Bélgica,
España, Francia, Grecia, Italia, P ortugal, Reino Unido, Argentina, Bra sil, Chile,
Colombia, Costa Rica, México, Perú, República Dominicana, Uruguay y Canadá.
Título: Comparative Labor Law Dossier. Externa lización y cadenas de producción
Keywords: outsourcing, supply chains, Temporary Employment Agencies, joint
liability, equal treatment principle
Palabras clave: subcontratación, cadenas de producción, Empresas de Traba jo
Temporal, responsabilidad solidaria, principio de igualdad de tra to
IUSLabor 3/2016, p. 1-157, ISSN 1699-2938
IUSLabor 3/2016
Summary
1. Outsourcing and supply chains in Belgium,by Pieter Pecinovsky and Miet
Vanhegen
2. Outsourcing and supply chains in France, by Foulques de Rostolan and
Guillaume Navarro
3. Outsourcing and supply chains in Germany,by Alexander Stöhr
4. Outsourcing and supply chains in Greece, by Evangelos D. Angelopoulos
and Sophia Ampoulidou
5. Outsourcing and supply chains in Italy, by Nicolò Rossi
6. Outsourcing and supply chains in Portugal, by Catarina de Oliveira
Carvalho and Ana Lambelho
7. Externalización y cadenas de producción en España, por Albert Martín
Gámez y Marta Martínez Martí
8. Outsourcing and supply chains in the United Kingdom, by Roger M
Walden
9. Externalización y cadenas de producción en Argentina, por Agustín Hernán
Carugo
10. Externalización y cadenas de producción en Brasil, por Helena Stela
Sampaio y Eduardo Pragmácio Filho
11. Externalización y cadenas de producción en Chile, por Francisco J. Tapia
Guerrero y Carmen Elena Domínguez S.
12. Externalización y cadenas de producción en Colombia, por Diana María
Gómez Hoyos
13. Externalización y cadenas de producción en Costa Rica, por Alexander
Godínez Vargas y Isabel C. Jaramillo Arango
14. Externalización y cadenas de producción en México, por Alfredo Sánchez-
Castañeda
15. Externalización y cadenas de producción en Perú, por Raúl G. Saco Barrios
y Karla Canova Talledo
16. Externalización y cadenas de producción en República Dominicana, por
José Federico Thomas
17. Outsourcing and supply chains in Canada, by Eric Tucker, Leah F. Vosko,
John Grundy and Alec Stromdahl
IUSLabor 3/2016
3
OUTSOURCING AND SUPPLY CHAINS IN BELGIUM
Pieter Pecinovsky and Miet Vanhegen
PhD Researchers at the Institute for Labour Law of KU Leuven, Belgium
Introduction
It is hard to find general data and numbers for outsourcing in Belgium. In 2008 Ernst &
Young (now E&Y) found in their European Outsourcing Survey that 81% of the
Belgium Company outsourced certain services, which made it the (relatively) biggest
outsourcer of all the surveyed countries. Unfortunately, Belgium was not included in the
survey of 2013. Due to the diversity of actors, there is no real official association or
committee which represents outsourcing companies or the sector and which would be
able to keep statistical data. However, it is obvious that outsourcing is a very popular
tool for companies in order to keep their focus on their core business. One of the main
legal forms to organize outsourcing in a company is (sub)contracting. In this sense, a
company, the user company, can rely on another company, the (sub)contractor, and its
employees to provide certain services or take over a part of the production process.
Because of the strict contractual nature of sub(contracting), there is no conclusive legal
framework with regard to the protection of employees in such contractual relation.
Temporary agency work however is a more well-defined type of labour, with clear rules
and limits. In 2015, there were 584.332 agency workers in Belgium, which equaled to
100.345 full time equivalents. This was a record high in the history of the Belgian
labour market. Especially students (217.880) seem to find their way to the world of
work through agency work, but it is also an important tool for 50+ workers (38.924).
42,7% of the agency workers are white collar workers, 57,3% are blue collar workers.
The gender balance is 60/40, with more male agency workers. The agency workers still
only make up 2,63% of the working population. Nonetheless, the agency activity grew
in 2015 with 11,16% and there was an increase in all the 3 regions, yet Flanders still
counts for 67,96% of all agency workers. There were 1.255 Temporary Employment
Workers, with a total permanent staff of 7458 employees, boosting an annual revenue of
close to 5 billion euros (data from the annual report of Federgon, 2015)
1. Is outsourcing a legal form of production organization?
In Belgium, outsourcing can be organized through various legal forms.

Para continuar leyendo

SOLICITA TU PRUEBA